Author Topic: inadequacies of modern day concert halls  (Read 3478 times)

Offline chase78

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Re: inadequacies of modern day concert halls
« Reply #15 on: June 21, 2010, 16:26 »
interestingly the best classical concert i went to is at esplanade.. and so is the worst. :)
i am not sure is it the seats or anything else so i hesitate to really give a conclusive comment.. my last experience there (not good seats - at circle 1) was quite bad, with no dynamics and overly dampened sound and swallowed mid range. whereas what lingers in my mind is of LA philharmonic orchestra performing at the same hall.. very rich sounds, dynamic and lively. don't quite remember where i was seating though, but it wasn't the best seats either.

any comments on yong siew tho conservatory? i went once and felt the volume somehow too loud so didn't revisit since then though had been meaning to give it another chance. :P

Went to Yong Siew Tho for the free NUS concerts quite a few times. Its good but Cant compare to esplanade. Different league. :) Like comparing Rotel Marantz with Bryston or Classe or Mark Levinson...
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Offline chase78

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Re: inadequacies of modern day concert halls
« Reply #16 on: June 21, 2010, 16:30 »

Another point which I find odd is that most of the bigger concerts have music that has been amplified and passed through speakers. The nearest thing to home hifi would perhaps be a small concert/ recital with no electronic amplification, then the sounds would be just from the instruments/ humans themselves and the soundstage and placement would be accurate too.

Guess hard to get to such sounds wo amplification. As most concert halls have to be of a certain scale.

IMHumbleOpinion, in live music there is less clear soundstage or clear separation of instruments. For the normal seats at back and middle, the music is one clump but of course way clearer and richer. Def not like listening to hifi at home where soundstage is distinct.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2010, 16:32 by chase78 »
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Offline ...

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Re: inadequacies of modern day concert halls
« Reply #17 on: June 21, 2010, 16:47 »
Guess hard to get to such sounds wo amplification. As most concert halls have to be of a certain scale.

IMHumbleOpinion, in live music there is less clear soundstage or clear separation of instruments. For the normal seats at back and middle, the music is one clump but of course way clearer and richer. Def not like listening to hifi at home where soundstage is distinct.
in live music,sounds are never as separated and there is no such thing as soundstage. sound is free to travel where ever the laws of physics direct. what conductors try for is for the different parts of the orchestra to congeal together in particular colour blends of their interpretation. if i'm not wrong, the soundstage of recorded music is added post-production,it is not a naturally occuring item.
i'm beginning to scoff to myself whenever the words high-fidelity and live music are used together,how can you try to recreate a live event when extraneous information is added to the recording? almost a oxymoron. i try not to pay any attention to 'soundstage' when listening to my setup, but the times i do, have to admit its shiok ;D  we audiophiles are strange,yes? ;D
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Offline jimi

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Re: inadequacies of modern day concert halls
« Reply #18 on: June 21, 2010, 17:18 »
in live music,sounds are never as separated and there is no such thing as soundstage. sound is free to travel where ever the laws of physics direct. what conductors try for is for the different parts of the orchestra to congeal together in particular colour blends of their interpretation. if i'm not wrong, the soundstage of recorded music is added post-production,it is not a naturally occuring item.
i'm beginning to scoff to myself whenever the words high-fidelity and live music are used together,how can you try to recreate a live event when extraneous information is added to the recording? almost a oxymoron. i try not to pay any attention to 'soundstage' when listening to my setup, but the times i do, have to admit its shiok ;D  we audiophiles are strange,yes? ;D

At a small non-amped recital, its quite easy to hear separation and the soundstage, well, its as wide as people on the stage (assuming the side walls are clear).

At a large event hall, I agree the sounds are not so distinct and its difficult to pick them out in space. I think this is due to the mic-amp-speaker set up and of course the room interactions.

It does pose the question: we are all aware of how amplifiers, speakers, etc can colour the sound, isn't it odd that we go to a big live music event just to hear it reproduced via the stage equipment?

What is nice about hifi is that we can lie back and if our equipment is resolving enough, we can close our eyes and visualise and hear a large orchestra perfectly separated in space and with perfect pitch and tone in an amazingly wide soundstage all in the comfort of our home and on demand- something which would be quite impossible in a large live music hall- unless not amped and you had a front seat. The price all the $'s you can spare and not spare LOL!!! ;D ;D ;D

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Re: inadequacies of modern day concert halls
« Reply #19 on: June 21, 2010, 17:28 »
At a small non-amped recital, its quite easy to hear separation and the soundstage, well, its as wide as people on the stage (assuming the side walls are clear).

it depends,with small groups like trios or quintets,yes ,its easy to pick them out. large ensembles will more or less blend together in tutti

At a large event hall, I agree the sounds are not so distinct and its difficult to pick them out in space. I think this is due to the mic-amp-speaker set up and of course the room interactions.

It does pose the question: we are all aware of how amplifiers, speakers, etc can colour the sound, isn't it odd that we go to a big live music event just to hear it reproduced via the stage equipment?

What is nice about hifi is that we can lie back and if our equipment is resolving enough, we can close our eyes and visualise and hear a large orchestra perfectly separated in space and with perfect pitch and tone in an amazingly wide soundstage all in the comfort of our home and on demand- something which would be quite impossible in a large live music hall- unless not amped and you had a front seat. The price all the $'s you can spare and not spare LOL!!! ;D ;D ;D

i think the money we spend on equipment can buy us the best seats for every weekend concert for many years, and its live ;D but i too prefer the comfort of home,
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