Author Topic: HDMI discussion thread - including new developments  (Read 65771 times)

Offline Doggie Howser

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Re: HDMI discussion thread - including new developments & 1.4
« Reply #45 on: March 08, 2010, 00:18 »
I think Pete and I were having a mature discussion abt the subject. :) hence my replies which were peppered with numerous smileys.

I thought that in the light of the moderator's stance abt williammaxtor's numerous flamebaits (ie monitor but not intervene), it seemed contradictory. :)
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Offline econav

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Re: HDMI discussion thread - including new developments & 1.4
« Reply #46 on: March 08, 2010, 01:07 »
anyway , for now that is no sign of any audio format change and 1.4 don't address anything on audio but the video bandwidth , in commercial / industry application the player have 1 port for audio and 1 port for video .
As far as i know currently no AVR or chipset support and decode both audio and video , that likely to say ,if you decide to go 3D by mid 2011 , all things go and all things change , except your speaker.

Do watch out a interface from China , a few jap mfr are working on it. :)
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Offline petetherock

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Re: HDMI discussion thread - including new developments & 1.4
« Reply #47 on: March 08, 2010, 06:28 »
IMO, if they are moving forward, getting a better connection will be one of the things they should do.
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Offline desray

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Re: HDMI discussion thread - including new developments & 1.4
« Reply #48 on: March 08, 2010, 07:33 »
I think Pete and I were having a mature discussion abt the subject. :) hence my replies which were peppered with numerous smileys.

I thought that in the light of the moderator's stance abt williammaxtor's numerous flamebaits (ie monitor but not intervene), it seemed contradictory. :)

I'm not gonna comment any further as you really do not see the whole picture here. It is most unfortunate but I'm glad that you make your point and I acknowledge your reaction if you 'think' in that manner.

On an endnote, when we 'moderate' (I speak on behalf of all the Mods and Queks as well) in deciding an action - i.e. whether to do intervene to mediate, to remain status-quo or 'ban' someone...we will usually consult each other first and gather the feedback before we decide what to do. Its never a one-man thing...we don't penalize or misuse our power or act on something on an impulse. That much I hoped you understand.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2010, 07:34 by desray »

Offline Doggie Howser

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Re: HDMI discussion thread - including new developments & 1.4
« Reply #49 on: March 08, 2010, 09:14 »
Sorry for the OT Pete.

Des, I get it. It's tough bring a moderator. Not all policies will go well with everyone. That's fine. I don't expect special treatment. Just consistency. So far, I have not seen a mod step in with as much as a "cool it" when williammaxtor goes on his flame posts. And here, Pete and I have a mature discussion and end up with a mod telling us to.

FWIW I see Pete's POV. In the interests of an elegant solution, this new HDMI1.4 and the associated hardware will be disruptive, but there are workarounds for it if you are inclined to. We've adapted to AVRs with no component inputs, then to those with no HDMI etc. And HDMI1.4 is no different. No loss of quality just a change in how we do things: switch inputs etc.

 
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Offline petetherock

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Re: HDMI discussion thread - including new developments & 1.4
« Reply #50 on: March 08, 2010, 09:21 »
Its ok, DH, there are also some chaps who feel Willie's posts have been justified, and hence have made the snide remarks in the feedback forums, good to know I am not alone (actually others have also indicated to me that I am not alone about the matter).

Anyway back to the HDMI issue, it is a smart move by the companies, imagine how much money there is to be if everyone is forced to convert?

So I still say: stay put enjoy your system and see if 3D is really useful for daily viewing...
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Offline Doggie Howser

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Re: HDMI discussion thread - including new developments & 1.4
« Reply #51 on: March 08, 2010, 09:59 »
I watch my shows primarily on the projector so it is unlikely I would be on the first batch of adopters.. unless there's an affordable 3D projector that also offers better contrast, ease of use and maintenance as my current model (AE3000).

I guess like many here, we adopt based on our own criteria: didn't see the need to upgrade from the AE3000 to the AE4000, nor the replacement for the Onkyo 875.

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Offline armoury

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Re: HDMI discussion thread - including new developments & 1.4
« Reply #52 on: March 08, 2010, 11:23 »
Des, I get it. It's tough bring a moderator. Not all policies will go well with everyone. That's fine. I don't expect special treatment. Just consistency. So far, I have not seen a mod step in with as much as a "cool it" when williammaxtor goes on his flame posts. And here, Pete and I have a mature discussion and end up with a mod telling us to.
Its ok, DH, there are also some chaps who feel Willie's posts have been justified, and hence have made the snide remarks in the feedback forums, good to know I am not alone (actually others have also indicated to me that I am not alone about the matter).

The difference IMHO is that everyone here recognises williammaxtor as a troll and has stopped feeding it.  And can't be arsed to dignify any of his further nonsense and is simply ignoring him. 

But when two senior and respected members seem to be going back and forth in quick succession, a gentle reminder blaming the heatwave and no one in particular isn't entirely remiss, is it?  Personally I didn't see any big deal in what was going on, but perhaps the idea is to nip it in bud... 

Me, I think I'll be sitting out until the dust settles.  Bottom line for me is that there probably isn't enough 3D software available to make any switch worthwhile.  And because my 500A is barely a year old, and my Oppo is even newer -- how to justify another upgrade?
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Offline Doggie Howser

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Re: HDMI discussion thread - including new developments & 1.4
« Reply #53 on: March 08, 2010, 11:41 »
FWIW I didn't think it was getting to the point where a reminder was needed.
:)

Perhaps I could have typed a longer more verbose response had I been on a computer but I was on the iphone.
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Offline petetherock

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3D HDTV and HDMI Explained
« Reply #54 on: March 10, 2010, 07:00 »

http://hdguru.com/3d-hdtv-and-hdmi-explained/1336/

Quote
Full HD 3D

Transmitting uncompressed Full High Definition 3D (FHD3D) signals (defined as 1920 x 1080 resolution for both the left and right eye [each frame]) requires connecting a 3D Blu-ray player to a FHD3D TV using a suitable HDMI cable. The FHD3D signal’s bit rate is 6.75 Gbps (gigabits per second). The HDMI 1.4 standard’s maximum bit rate of 10.2Gbps is identical to that of the older HDMI 1.3 standard.

The 1920 x 2205 pixel at 24Hz (see drawing above) FHD3D signal differs from any previous HD or 3D signal. 1920 is the number of active pixels across each frame while 2205 pixels is the vertical resolution of two Full HD frames plus 45 pixels of active blanking separating the FHD left and right frames.

As the drawing illustrates, the signal places the two frames in a configuration known as “over/under.” This is the first and currently only FHD3D TV standard signal and because it is totally new, no non-FHD3D display can accept it.

This is important, as some consumer electronics writers speculate incorrectly that a modification will allow legacy 120Hz and 240Hz LCD displays to handle Blu-ray FHD3D content.

That said, Mitsubishi’s 2007, 2008 and 2009 legacy rear projection sets can be adapted to play these new FHD3D signals. Mitsubishi announced and demonstrated at the 2010 CES a converter box that down-converts the Blu-ray FHD3D HDMI signal (albeit at half resolution [960 x1080] for each eye). The converter box is due to arrive around the same time the first 3D capable Blu-ray players ship this spring.

The new HDMI 1.4 standard also permits another “over/under” 3D configuration at the lower 720p HD resolution (1280×720) at either 60Hz or 50 Hz Blu-ray player output.

All 3D Blu-ray players output FHD3D movies at 24 fps. Both LED LCD and CCFL backlit FH3D HDTVs internally convert the signal to sequential display (alternating left and right frames) at 240Hz (synchronizing with shutter glasses that provide 120 views per second for left and right eyes [120+120 =240]. All announced FHD3D plasma displays internally convert the 3D Blu-ray movie signals from “over/under” to frame sequential at 120 Hz for 60 views per second for each eye.

Surround Sound Receivers

Unfortunately, your current HDMI equipped surround sound receiver will not pass the new FHD3D signal and no upgrades are possible according to both Sony and Denon. Why? A system called EDID (Extended Display Identification Data) currently handles communications between your TV, receiver and source components and it works fine. However, when your new 3D television communicates that it is an FHD3D television, the receiver will not understand because the 3D ID was not part of the standard when your receiver was designed. The receiver will shut off the HDMI signal and your new 3D TV screen will go black.

Your only solution will be to replace your receiver with a new one that’s 3D compatible or use one of a number of available “work arounds.”  You can still use your current HDMI receiver with Panasonic’s upcoming 3D Blu-ray player because it includes a separate “audio only” HDMI output. Connect the video HDMI directly to your 3D set and the audio HDMI to your receiver to decode Dolby TruHD or DTS lossless codecs. No other manufacturer has announced this feature. You can also use coax or optical digital “outs” from the 3D Blu-ray player but you won’t get lossless audio and you’ll still have to connect the 3D Blu-ray player directly to the 3D HDTV to see the picture.

3D HDMI Cables

Will your existing 1.3 HDMI cables handle the FHD3D signal or will you have to replace them? The only way to really know is to connect it and see if they work. Some will, some won’t. If the cable can handle the 6.75 Gbps FHD3D data rate, it probably will.


There are two types of legacy 1.3 HDMI cables: Category 1 and Category 2. The former must be able to handle at least 2.25 Gbps signals, meaning it may not be able to handle FHD3D signal . Category 2 HDMI 1.3 cables handle signals up to 10.2 Gbps. These will certainly work.

The HDMI 1.4 standard has optional features for both TV and source component makers, including an audio return function and Ethernet connectivity (which allows one Ethernet signal to be carried to other connected components via HDMI if the maker includes this 1.4 feature).

To streamline HDMI cable selection Silicon Image dispensed with the old numerical system and replaced it with the following categories  (source: hdmi.org website):

Standard HDMI Cable
The Standard HDMI cable is designed to handle most home applications, and is tested to reliably transmit 1080i or 720p video – the HD resolutions that are commonly associated with cable and satellite television, digital broadcast HD, and upscaling DVD players.

Standard HDMI Cable with Ethernet
This cable type offers the same baseline performance as the Standard HDMI Cable shown above (720p or 1080i video resolution), plus an additional, dedicated data channel, known as the HDMI Ethernet Channel, for device networking. HDMI Ethernet Channel functionality is only available if both linked devices are HDMI Ethernet Channel-enabled.

Automotive HDMI Cable
Designed for internal cabling of vehicles equipped with onboard HD video systems. Tested to a more robust performance standard, and capable of withstanding the unique stresses of the motoring environment such as vibration and temperature extremes.

High Speed HDMI Cable
The High Speed HDMI cable is designed and tested to handle video resolutions of 1080p and beyond, including advanced display technologies such as 4K, 3D, and Deep Color. If you are using any of these technologies, or if you are connecting your 1080p display to a 1080p content source, such as a Blu-ray Disc player, this is the recommended cable.

High Speed HDMI Cable with Ethernet
This cable type offers the same baseline performance as the High Speed HDMI Cable shown above (1080p video resolution and beyond), plus an additional, dedicated data channel, known as the HDMI Ethernet Channel, for device networking. HDMI Ethernet Channel functionality is only available if both linked devices are HDMI Ethernet Channel-enabled.

« Last Edit: March 10, 2010, 10:28 by petetherock »
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Offline koroshiya8

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Re: HDMI discussion thread - including new developments & 1.4
« Reply #55 on: March 10, 2010, 09:58 »
FWIW I didn't think it was getting to the point where a reminder was needed.
:)

Perhaps I could have typed a longer more verbose response had I been on a computer but I was on the iphone.


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Offline Doggie Howser

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Re: HDMI discussion thread - including new developments & 1.4
« Reply #56 on: March 10, 2010, 10:12 »
I see the market for an HDMI 1.4 splitter/switch :)

Takes HDMI 1.4 inputs from 3D BR/cable boxes etc

Outputs HDMI 1.4 3D video to display
Outputs HDMI audio only to AVR

Negotiates the AutoID in between so the AVR and the 3D source don't have to downsample/convert.

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Offline petetherock

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HDMI Cable Speed & Features Explained
« Reply #57 on: March 12, 2010, 23:12 »
http://www.audioholics.com/education/cables/hdmi-cable-speed

Quote
Lies, Damned Lies, and Video Cable


Accordingly, before we start to talk about the things that really matter, let's get rid of some of the rubbish that can simply be dismissed as false or simply irrelevant, but which finds its way onto packages and into advertising copy:

"1080p certification"
There's no such thing.  We will get to the question of cable speeds later, which does relate in a way to this subject.
Support for new audio formats, such as Dolby TrueHD
While support for audio formats is a wonderful thing, cables have nothing to do with it.  All HDMI cables support Dolby TrueHD, et cetera, and since these audio formats have no impact upon the bitrate, no cable supports them any better than any other.
"Speed Rated" HDMI
Apart from two official speed ratings, "standard" (Category 1) and "high" (Category 2), as defined by HDMI Licensing, there are no other official speed rating standards for HDMI.  Some resellers of Chinese HDMI cables at crazy-high prices (yes, you know the one I'm thinking of) mark their cables with bogus "speed ratings" for which there are no published standards or specifications.   If it says "Ultra High Speed," or something like that, step slowly (or at Ultra-High Speed, if you prefer) away.
Support for x.v.YCC colorspace
Like support for Dolby TrueHD, a good thing; but, just as with Dolby, supported equally by all HDMI cables regardless of type, spec version or anything else.
Support for other specific resolutions, features and protocols
With the exception of the new Ethernet and audio return channel feature, whether it's 2K by 4K video, Deep Color, or what-have-you, support for these features depends entirely on the cable's rated speed and the impact of the particular feature on the bitrate, not on the nature of the feature.
"120Hz" or "240Hz" support
No set-top device emits an HDMI signal at these framerates, though the Sony PS3 and any PC has the potential.  Rather, a display labeled "120Hz" or "240Hz" has an internal frame-refresh rate as stated.  It's completely irrelevant to the HDMI cable or to the signal the HDMI cable carries.  
With all of that on the rubbish heap and burning, there's very little left in the marketing-speak of HDMI cable, and that's a good thing.  As complex as HDMI standards can be, and as complex as transmission-line theory can be, buying HDMI cable actually ought to be fairly simple, in part because...

Digital Is Digital
As long as one appreciates the limits of the point, it's an important point to make: a digital signal is just a string of ones and zeros.  When a digital signal gets through a cable, and is interpreted correctly at the other end with no dropped bits, the result is no loss of information, and hence no loss of picture or sound quality.   The signal may have suffered a great deal of degradation along the way from multiple causes; there may have been EMI, RFI, intrapair skew, interpair skew, return loss, rounding from capacitance, attenuation, anything - but if the bitstream gets read correctly at the end of the process, none of that degradation makes one bit (either figuratively or literally) of difference.


"Speed Rating" a Cable - Separating Science from Nonsense
As we've pointed out, there are some nonsense "speed rating" systems for HDMI cable out there, which exist largely just to adorn the packages containing HDMI cable with up-selling tools for the vendor.   Whether it's "Ultra High Speed," or just "Faster 'n' All Get-Out," you can safely ignore these labels--they are completely meaningless.  However, there is one important, but limited, sense in which one can meaningfully and accurately talk about "speed ratings" for HDMI cables.

First-generation HDMI cables were designed with 1080i and 720p video in mind, at eight-bit color depth.  Both of these resolutions require a clock rate of 74.25 MHz, and 742.5 Mbps per data channel in the HDMI signal, and originally (through HDMI specification 1.2), this is what HDMI cable compliance testing was targeted at.  With HDMI specification 1.3, however, the single-link bandwidth limit per data channel was raised to 3.4 Gbps, to accommodate such things as deep color and higher framerates, and from what we've already said above it should be clear that a cable which works fine at 742.5 Mbps will not necessarily work at a data rate which is over four times as fast.  To address this issue, HDMI specification 1.3 introduced two "Categories" of HDMI cable, somewhat blandly named "Category 1" and "Category 2."  Ever since 1.3, all HDMI cables which are tested for compliance certification are designated either as Category 1, and tested at 742.5 Mbps/channel, or as Category 2, and tested both at 1.65 Gbps (without equalization) and at 3.4 Gbps/channel (with equalization).  A cable which has passed Category 2 certification is capable of handling any data rate allowed under the HDMI specification; a cable which has passed Category 1, but not Category 2, is certified capable of handling anything up to 742.5 Mbps/channel, representing conventional 720p or 1080i HD resolutions at their normal framerates and eight-bit color depth.

The "Category 1" and "Category 2" labels for these data-speed tests, not being descriptive, seem to have been a bit confusing for consumers, and accordingly, the HDMI Licensing organization has announced that they should be referred to as "Standard Speed" and "High Speed" instead.  Additionally, in response to the deceptive use of bogus vendor "speed ratings," HDMI Licensing has expressly prohibited the use of variants such as "Ultra High Speed" and the like, so that with any luck the only "speeds" being talked about soon will be Standard and High.

What About "Gigabits per Second" Ratings?
For various reasons, many vendors avoid talking about the official "High" and "Standard" speed categories, and instead like to claim that a cable is rated for some particular speed which may be higher or lower than the tested speeds under Category 2.  We recommend that you disregard these claims.  There are no objective engineering standards against which to test them, and none of the vendors who make these sorts of claims publish the criteria by which they have allegedly rated their own cables.

One other problem with relying on these claims is that it is not always clear what is meant by a stated data rate.  The use of terminology here has been incredibly sloppy.  The HDMI organization will sometimes refer to the official speeds by giving the single-channel data rate (e.g., 3.4 Gbps for the higher- speed of the two Category 2 tests), and sometimes by giving the three-channel data rate (e.g. 10.2 Gbps for the same).  To know what is meant when a data rate is cited, you've got to know whether it's the one-channel or the three-channel rate.  To make matters worse, the HDMI organization also sometimes calls the clock speed (one-tenth the bitrate), stated in Megahertz, the "bandwidth" of the cable.  This is simply an incorrect use of the term, and it means that the 3.4 Gbps speed not only may sometimes be called 10.2 Gbps, but also may be called 340 MHz.  In actual fact, a cable which could only handle 340 MHz of bandwidth, as that term is ordinarily defined, could not handle a 3.4 Gbps datastream - the cable bandwidth required is somewhere in the neighborhood of 1.5 times the data rate, expressed in Hertz, or 5.1 GHz - this accommodates the maximum fundamental frequency (half the data rate) plus its third harmonic.

Ethernet and Audio Return Channel
One other characteristic feature which an HDMI cable may carry is the new "Ethernet channel," and its accompanying sub-feature, the "Audio Return Channel."  To fit these features into the HDMI cable, there is a slightly revised cable structure available under 1.4 which reconfigures a couple of the miscellaneous conductors into a 100-ohm balanced data line for use in Ethernet, with one side of that line also being used to allow a display to send multichannel audio back "upstream" to an A/V receiver.  It's a kludgy arrangement, and makes for a complex specification.  We have our doubts that these will ever be features to see much use, but as with all future things, it's hard to say.

What About Version Numbers?
You'll notice we haven't said much about version numbers, and there's a reason for that.  Version numbers have tended to confuse the issue more often than not, and HDMI Licensing has asked us to stop using them to describe cables (Editor's Note: They have also forced manufacturers to stop using them to describe electronics as well - a move we don't necessarily agree with). Why?  Because a version number, by itself, tells you nothing useful about the cable.  All versions of the spec permit cables to be certified compliant at the "Standard" speed data rate, and all versions of the spec permit cables to be certified compliant without an Ethernet channel.  A cable tested and found compliant using spec version 1.4 does not necessarily offer any advantage over a cable tested and found compliant using spec version 1.1, and to know whether it does you need only to know two things: (1) is it certified as a "high speed" or a "standard speed" cable, and (2) does it carry an Ethernet channel?  Meanwhile, HDMI Licensing has made the requirement explicit that before a cable is certified as compliant at a specific length, it must be tested and found compliant either at that length or longer, so there should be no squeezing around the issue by marketing a cable found compliant at 3 feet as though it had been found compliant at 50.



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Offline petetherock

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Re: HDMI discussion thread - including new developments & 1.4
« Reply #58 on: March 12, 2010, 23:13 »
Quote
How to Tell the Compliant Status of an HDMI Cable
The advice we have been giving for a long time holds true still: if you actually want to know whether a cable is compliant, and at what standard, you need to see the vendor's compliance certificate.  When a cable is tested and found compliant, a certificate which shows the length of the cable, and the nature of the testing (Category 1 or 2, with or without Ethernet) is issued.  If your vendor doesn't have one for their cable, that may well be because the cable is, despite representations to the contrary, non-compliant.

HDMI Licensing has issued a new set of logos which are, in future, to be used to label HDMI cable assemblies.  There are five of these, only four of which are applicable to conventional HDMI cables (the last is for automotive use), and which cover the four possible answers to the two questions: standard speed or high?  Ethernet or not?

Now, the clever fellows who think up ways to sell cables are no doubt working out just how they're going to make new specious claims about HDMI cables without running afoul of the trademark licensing guidelines, and it will be interesting indeed to see what they come up with.  When you run into new, strange and interesting ways of rating HDMI cables, be alert: more likely than not, the purpose is not to teach you something about HDMI cable but to pry more money out of your wallet. 
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Offline petetherock

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1.3a is ok enough... CEDIA says
« Reply #59 on: March 20, 2010, 17:51 »


http://www.cedia.com.au/index.cfm/page/news_detail/id/217

Quote
Comments were put together by CEDIA members David Meyer (Kordz) & Michael Heiss

3D WILL run through existing HDMI cables. However we do believe that 3D will ‘up the ante’ in terms of quality of cable, but from a bandwidth perspective, nothing changes... yet. Virtually all currently deployed HDMI over 5m in length (generally) are NOT High Speed, rather Standard Speed certification level, but with sufficient headroom to enable 1080p operation. Note that these cables are only certified to 720p/1080i (provided they are certified at all!), and used without compliance to 1080p level. Most installers don’t really care about certified performance, just “whether it will work” – unfortunate, but fact. This will however become more of an issue moving forward.

1. 3D from Blu-ray has been mandated at an initial maximum of 1080p/24 per eye, meaning effectively 1080p/48 combined data rate – less than the current 2D standard of 1080p/60. So if the HDMI cable supports 1080p/60 fine now, it will also support 3D from Blu-ray no problem. Note: it is insufficient to talk resolution without referencing frame rate as it does not otherwise define the data rate. Gaming has been defined under the new specification 1.4a (out just last week) that 720p/60 per eye be supported, but gamers will likely want 1080p in due course. When this happens I predict that we’ll see gaming go to 1080p/60 per eye, meaning nearly 9.0Gbps – DEFINITELY High Speed and nothing less – currently cables that support 1080p/60 in 2D, but without High Speed certification, will NOT support 1080p/60 in 3D. In the meantime though, support for such high res/frame rate has not been made mandatory, and is merely speculative.

2. It is NOT necessary to upgrade to a so-called “HDMI 1.4” cable to enable 3D support. Also, any cable which is referred to by the manufacturer as “HDMI 1.4” is in fact non-compliant due to its breach of the HDMI Logo & Trademark guidelines. So, should you care if a cable is simply mislabelled? Absolutely! Labelling the cable in a compliant manner is the easy part; making the cable to perform in a compliant manner is actually the really hard part. If a manufacturer can’t get the small stuff right, how can they be trusted with the big stuff?

3. For broadcast, the HDMI 1.4a specification mandates support for 720p & 1080i @ 50/59.94/60 refresh rates (NOT 1080p at all), using “over and under” and “side by side” 3D formats. This means both left and right eye images share the same frame, keeping bandwidth the same as current 2D equivalents, but effectively halving the resulting resolution per eye when displayed on screen. Bottom line, Standard Speed HDMI is fine for broadcast

4. So will HD Set top boxes need to be HDMI 1.4 compliant to handle 3D? This all depends on whether the set top box will have any requirement to know that an incoming broadcast signal is 3D, and flag it as such. If so, then firmware will need to be upgraded, effectively changing the device to HDMI 1.4a compliance (I suspect this will be the case). If it’s just a slave and throughputs the signal passively, with the broadcaster flagging the content for a display to recognize it as 3D and do its thing, then the boxes wouldn’t need an upgrade and 1.3 spec is fine (highlyunlikely). Either way there will not be any hardware change, at least not specifically for the 3D feature. That is, it is expected that all devices will require 1.4a compliance to support 3D, but that does not mean having to buy all new devices – some will simply be firmware upgraded. Sony are already offering this with some of their Blu-ray players.

 

As for HDMI Ethernet Channel (HEC), this is an optional extra feature of both devices and cables, with the latter requiring the additional label “...with Ethernet” on cables. As Michael says, HEC is not used at all for 3D – this is absolutely true. The Audio Return Channel will use the HEC for best results, but can also still work in “Single Line” mode through cables without the Ethernet Channel. So choosing a HDMI cable with Ethernet Channel opens up support for distribution of Ethernet over HDMI, and the most robust operation of Audio Return Channel. It is NOT required for 3D.

 

So, suffice to say that HDMI cables that currently support 1080p/60 can continue to be used for 3D from all sources, but with new installations, upgrading to true certified High Speed will certainly give a far superior degree of “future proofing”, especially when considering where gaming is likely to go.

 

We hope this helps answer some of the mysteries out in the industry.
Please post instead of sending a pm, so more can learn.

My gear:
http://peteswrite.blogspot.com/2019/04/my-setup-42019.html