Author Topic: Before you post, this thread might help answer some of your questions in HT  (Read 119549 times)

Online petetherock

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Simple AV amp setup tips
« Reply #60 on: October 06, 2009, 13:36 »
- you may wish to have a mirror behind the amp stuck to the wall or the shelf so you know what inputs are there

- label each cable

- give yourself not only enough room for the cable connected, but also for you to put your hand there and remove it in future

- I suggest at least 4 inches of space around the amp - more if you own one of the Onkyos or other designs where there is a fan to blow the heat away

- the amp should ideally sit on the strongest shelf and be on the top shelf too

- cover unused inputs with the silicon or plastic cap protectors to prevent oxidisation

- I stick a simple light near the back of my amp - so I can see what I am doing to adjust the cables and also remove them more easily
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Offline wingboi

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hi all, i need help from you guys. im still thinking whether to get a sound system or not. btw im placing it in my room. budget is around 450 to 500. hmm. normal room size. please help. im a noob in this.

Online petetherock

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Some buying tips - my personal take
« Reply #62 on: November 21, 2009, 16:02 »
Just some personal opinions on shopping for a new setup.

http://www.xtremeplace.com/yabbse/index.php?topic=73638.0


The steps are simple:

- decide on a budget - no sense gazing at setups which cost a lot more or less, as the lust factor may set in and when you assemble something that costs a lot less, it may sound so different from that dream system that it is all a let down...

- WAF == don't underestimate this. Life is a compromise. If we could have miles of cabling sprawled all over plus a brace of SVS subs in our living room, thats nice, but for the sake of matrimonial harmony, we have to decide if satellites and cutesy speakers can placate the wife instead of mean big black boxes.

- HT, music or both. Both will cost you. HT is about ambience, the surround effect, room treatment and speaker placement. Don't underestimate the importance of room treatment. So if you your lair is also your living room, understand the limitations of getting the right surround effect.

As for music, know that good stands for bookshelve speakers and many other audiophile tweaks do help. If you want a good musical experience from that budget HT setup and want a "musical system", then you are not being realistic.  Expect a good stereo amp to do the job or understand that a AV amp is probably only as good as a stereo amp which is 1/4 the cost.

Finally hard work - it takes time and effort. It has been written many times that no amount of money spent on fancy equipment will replace elbow grease and you should expect to spend time placing your setup and moving furniture to ahcieve an ideal HT experience. With that, you can spend less and yet get a dcent effect. Or wonder why it sounds so different compared to the homes you auditioned.

Final words - a bit of advice, you can audition a few homes, but each owner has a difference emphasis and taste. Get one or two closest to your taste and budget, then build things up from there.

After you buy, sit back and enjoy!

Cheers

PS: about a month after you buy, there will always be a better system, newer features and something else you could have done. If that drives you mad, then you are now truly a Xtremeplace member.... :)
« Last Edit: April 30, 2010, 07:04 by petetherock »
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Offline MatJenin

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Dear brothers & sisters of the AV world,

I am new here and would like to solicit some advice....  I noticed many of the aftermarket power cables are of US type pin. Where can I get one with our local type of pin?  What kind of modification is needed if I were to purchase the US type? Where can I get it done?

I will be taking delivery of my Yamaha 2000 series Amp & CD Player with Soanos 2 speakers in a few days time. And intend to use one of those cable to improve the system. Also, should I connect the CD to Amp using "balanced" or "unbalanced" interconnect? What the difference? Is there noticeable difference in term of audio quality?

Thanks so much!
HT: Sony VPL-VW870ES 4K Laser Projector|Denon AVR-X7200W|OS 130" widescreen (Motorised)|Oppo UDP-203 Ultra HD Blu-Ray Disc Player|Popcorn Hour PCH A500 Pro Media Player|Def Tech STS Front HT Speakers with built-in Sub-woofer|Def Tech Mythos 10 Centre HT Speaker|
Def Tech UIW Front Height HT Speakers|Def Tech UIW Surround HT Speakers (In-Ceiling Mount)|Def Tech Surround Back HT Speakers (In-Ceiling Mount)|JL Audio F113 SW|Logitech Harmony 1100 Universal RC | Apple TV 4K

Offline Doggie Howser

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You can custom build the cables. A few places sell the power cords in bulk and you can match it to a Hospital grade UK style plug along with the grade of IEC connectors.

I got mine from AVIT in SLS.

I believe bro DJQ also can modify the iego cables with UK plugs.

Alternatively, you can get a distributor/conditioner with universal plugs that can accept US plugs or both US/UK designs.

End of Line - Derezzed

Offline MatJenin

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Thanks bro. Got any advice on my qn on "balanced" vs "unbalanced" interconnect?
HT: Sony VPL-VW870ES 4K Laser Projector|Denon AVR-X7200W|OS 130" widescreen (Motorised)|Oppo UDP-203 Ultra HD Blu-Ray Disc Player|Popcorn Hour PCH A500 Pro Media Player|Def Tech STS Front HT Speakers with built-in Sub-woofer|Def Tech Mythos 10 Centre HT Speaker|
Def Tech UIW Front Height HT Speakers|Def Tech UIW Surround HT Speakers (In-Ceiling Mount)|Def Tech Surround Back HT Speakers (In-Ceiling Mount)|JL Audio F113 SW|Logitech Harmony 1100 Universal RC | Apple TV 4K

Offline Doggie Howser

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I have not been able to do an A:B comparison of the same cables in balanced vs unbalanced config before.

But I generally find balanced quieter with lower noise floor. Definitely recommended.

End of Line - Derezzed

Offline MatJenin

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Noted. Thanks so much bro!
HT: Sony VPL-VW870ES 4K Laser Projector|Denon AVR-X7200W|OS 130" widescreen (Motorised)|Oppo UDP-203 Ultra HD Blu-Ray Disc Player|Popcorn Hour PCH A500 Pro Media Player|Def Tech STS Front HT Speakers with built-in Sub-woofer|Def Tech Mythos 10 Centre HT Speaker|
Def Tech UIW Front Height HT Speakers|Def Tech UIW Surround HT Speakers (In-Ceiling Mount)|Def Tech Surround Back HT Speakers (In-Ceiling Mount)|JL Audio F113 SW|Logitech Harmony 1100 Universal RC | Apple TV 4K

Online petetherock

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Mounting a projector
« Reply #68 on: January 04, 2010, 20:35 »
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Online petetherock

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Crawling for bass
« Reply #69 on: March 21, 2010, 17:23 »
Courtesy of Bro Desray:
This is a technique used by many Home Theater enthusiasts to 'locate' the best subwoofer location in your listening room. Hear out what Alan Lofft has to say about this technique and how to do it correctly. It'll be easier to execute when there is 'space' to move around. If you are constrained by space...since its quite common for most HDB dwellers, such as myself (4m x 4m cubic) then 'crawling' around may a challenge for some of us especially when there are a lot of speakers lying all around - let's face it, most of us are contending for space here...we're not like the Americans with a huge basement to play around with *sighz*...if you're facing such issue and yearn to fix the sub's frequency response for a crispier and punchy bass note, you can invest in a dedicated Sub-EQ or a AVR with Audyssey Multi-XT EQ technology built-in...to resolve poor placement predicament.

[youtube]AV3oLLMgS-M[/youtube]

Try it today and see if it works for ya...it worked for me :)


We hasten to add that you should add your furniture first, then do this and then the Audyssey or other auto-setup devices, and finally use the SPL meter.
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Online petetherock

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> What To Listen For When Auditioning Speakers
« Reply #70 on: September 06, 2010, 08:59 »
http://stason.org/TULARC/entertainment/audio/general/12-2-What-should-I-listen-for-when-evaluating-speakers.html


Some highlights:

Quote
When comparing two speakers side-by-side, doing an AB
comparison, be extremely careful to match the levels before
evaluating. A slight level difference can make one speaker
sound better, even though the difference may not be perceived
as a level difference. Some claim that you will be influenced
by a difference of less than 1/2 dB!

First and foremost, the sound should be natural. If you listen
to vocals, close your eyes and try to picture someone singing in
the same room with you. Does it sound realistic? Likewise with
instruments. You selected recordings of instruments that you
like and have heard live. Do they sound like what you remember
them sounding like live?

Your very first impression should be something like "what nice
sound". If your initial gut reaction is "gosh, what a lot of
detail", the system is likely to be heavy in the treble (often
interpreted by beginners as "more detailed") and you'll probably
find that annoying after a while. If your first reaction is
"hey, what powerful bass", then the system is probably
bass-heavy, rather than ideal. The most common mistake for
beginners is to buy a system with REALLY powerful bass, because
it sounds "impressive" at first. After a while, though, you'll
get tired of being thumped on the head by your music.

Not to say that good bass and treble aren't important. But your
first realization should be that the music is all there, and
that it comes together as good music, without one particular
part trying to dominate it. Sit back and listen to it for a
bit. You should be able to pick out the individual instruments
if you want. They shouldn't force themselves on you, and you
should also be able to hear the music as a single piece, the sum
of its parts, without feeling like each of the instruments is
trying to grab your attention away from the others.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2010, 09:07 by petetherock »
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Online petetherock

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http://www.hometheater.com/content/how-buy-blu-ray-player



How to Buy a Blu-ray Player
By Shane Buettner • Posted: Feb 28, 2011

Getting the Best Blu for Your Buck

In addition to supporting the legacy lossy surround formats we’ve enjoyed for years on DVD, Blu-ray Disc offers lossless audio in the form of DTS-HD Master Audio and Dolby TrueHD. This means that while the digital data file that contains the audio content is compressed to save storage space on the disc, the signal is fully restored on playback, bit-for-bit identical to the soundtrack master. The DVDs we’ve lived with for years got a lot of sound out of an often MP3-sized bit bucket, albeit by discarding some information. Lossless audio is a sea change in terms of dynamics, detail, and overall transparency. You don’t need a set of golden ears to hear the difference; with even a moderate system, we think you’ll be wowed.

Most BD players today can transmit DTS-HD Master Audio and Dolby TrueHD as native bitstreams or perform full internal decoding to PCM. When you’re buying a player, be mindful of the A/V receiver or surround processor you’ll use with the player. If it’s a newer model with HDMI audio processing capability, welcome to single-cable heaven. Older HDMI-equipped AVRs and processors may not be able to decode DTS-HD Master Audio and Dolby TrueHD internally, which means conversion to PCM in the player is required. That’s A-OK, as both transmission methods are qualitatively similar if not identical in the end result. Both offer the full lossless audio experience. Just be aware that with bitstream audio, you’re forgoing access to secondary audio for commentaries, PiP streams on the fly, and the various sounds that accompany menu selections. If you choose PCM out from the player, you won’t have to jump into the player’s setup menu to access such features when you want them.

Many pre-HDMI A/V receivers and surround processors have multichannel (5.1 or 7.1) analog audio inputs. If this describes your equipment, you’re still not out of the lossless audio market. If you’re not ready to upgrade, you’ll have to spend extra bucks on a player that not only has internal decoding for DTS-HD Master Audio and Dolby TrueHD, but has multichannel analog audio outputs as well. While this too offers full-resolution, lossless audio, it’s not our first-choice connection method for lossless audio. Your AVR or surround processor will typically have more sophisticated bass-management options for your surround sound system than a BD player will. And with many AVRs and processors using the multichannel analog inputs, this bypasses advanced, performance-enhancing post-processing features like DSP modes or even room EQ. HDMI offers the best combination of performance and flexibility.

Blu Basics: All That Video
The simple truth, which manufacturers of expensive BD players won’t be thrilled to read, is that our testing of BD players has consistently revealed that basic 1080p Blu-ray playback over HDMI yields essentially perfect performance regardless of the player, even on a large screen. If you’re a videophile (like we are), the purchase of a player with superior video processing will primarily buy you improved performance with upconverted DVDs and the few Blu-ray Discs that are mastered at 1080i (some concert videos and TV programs, for example). But even that won’t cost you an exorbitant amount of money. Sub-$300 players we’ve tested from Panasonic, Samsung, and Sony offer very good processing with a broad variety of discs, while OPPO’s $499 BDP-93 is totally beyond reproach. Among the processing sets we’ve tested in BD players, proprietary solutions from Panasonic have consistently passed all of our tests, and we’ve seen great performance from name-brand solutions like HQV (Denon’s players) and Anchor Bay’s VRS (OPPO’s first players, Marantz, and others). This isn’t to say that these are the only solutions that offer fine performance, or that these are the only players that offer great performance and value. Sony’s PS3 remains one of our favorites, and it doesn’t even offer processing for HD signals. But if you’re a videophile and you’re looking for the best pure video performance, these standouts offer the best potential to make your entire existing library of DVDs and the variety of material on Blu-ray Disc look their best. But there are other factors to consider too.

Blu Basics: Firmware Updates Are a Sad Fact of Life
With Blu-ray Disc players, firmware updates are a necessary evil. Most often, these updates don’t offer anything new or exciting in terms of updated features or functions; they merely ensure that you’ll be able to play the next blockbuster release without any hiccups.

Sony’s PlayStation 3 is popular, and it’s apparent the studios work hard to ensure proper playback on that platform. The PS3 is more devoid of playback issues than any player we’ve experienced. OPPO’s players have been nearly as solid, but perhaps just as importantly, OPPO has been ultra swift on the trigger finger when issues have arisen, delivering fast, easy-to-implement firmware updates when needed. Overall, player stability seems much improved since Blu-ray’s early days. These players probably aren’t the only platforms that provide this level of reliability, but since our firsthand experience with them is extensive, they’ve earned this shout-out.


Performing updates from the Internet is the fastest, simplest way. So consider whether the equipment rack your player will be located in has a hard-wired Ethernet connection, or look at players that either come with or offer accessories for Wi-Fi Internet connectivity. Even if you’re not a fan of BD-Live Internet-based interactivity, you’ll need Net access to keep your player up to speed with the latest firmware updates.

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Online petetherock

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Blu Extras: Interactivity and the Need for Speed
The only way in which Blu-ray Disc is a step back from DVD is in its loading and disc-access times. Early players were plagued with agonizingly slow load times, especially for discs heavy with the Java coding that powers all of BD’s compelling interactivity—the real-time chapter menus and PiP, games, BD-Live connectivity, etc. The PS3 became an early sensation for its speed and reliability and remains so for those same reasons. OPPO’s BDP-83 was the first standalone player to challenge the PS3 in terms of speed and reliability, and the other current standouts include recent players from LG and Samsung. Depending on your frustration tolerance, speed might be the best reason for you to buy a certain player over another and the best motivation for those who bought sluggish first- or second-generation BD players to look at an upgrade.

Blu Extras: Stream Away
It’s not a dramatic stretch to call the PlayStation 3 the set-top box that won the format war for Blu-ray. If the PS3’s evolution as a multiplatform media hub has taught us (and manufacturers) anything, it’s that Blu-ray players don’t need to be dirt cheap to move off the store shelves; they just need to offer desirable features and therefore more value. Today’s BD players are Internet-connected devices that offer a host of streaming applications and features to grab content off the Web. YouTube videos (for all you Double Rainbow Guy fans out there), Flickr and Picasa photos, and Pandora Internet radio are all regulars on a variety of players from the major manufacturers. We’re currently recommending players from LG, Panasonic, Samsung, Sony and Toshiba that have compelling streaming feature sets (OPPO’s next generation of players will follow suit). Fans of movies on demand can look for Blockbuster, Netflix, and Amazon apps. But we’re especially high on VUDU’s HDX streams. When the bandwidth is there, VUDU delivers the highest-quality 1080p streams we’ve seen and is now offering 5.1-channel Dolby Digital Plus surround sound. (Netflix is also rolling out Dolby Digital Plus 5.1 with its streams as well, but at press time, the hardware platforms supporting it were very limited but sure to grow.) VUDU isn’t Blu-ray quality, but we’re still impressed. Just check the spec sheet for the streaming apps you want before you buy. Also note that the quality of your streaming video feeds will depend heavily on the speed of your Internet connection. If your broadband pipeline is too slow, it’s time to call your ISP and ask for that turbo-charged data package.

To 3D or Not to 3D
Not all 3D will be created equal. As we go to press, the only way to get full 1080p 3D at each eye is from Blu-ray 3D. All of the 3D formats in use for cable and satellite appear to be half-resolution 3D masquerading as high def. Unfortunately, at present some of the best Blu-ray 3D content is only available in exclusive bundles of 3D equipment from specific manufacturers, but that’s a story for a different day. For now, whether you’re looking for a Blu-ray 3D player or the right manufacturer’s bundle with a 3D player and 3DTV, we have some hot tips.

First, beware of a player labeled “3D ready.” While the word ready means good to go to you and me, in this arena, it means that the player requires a firmware update to play back Blu-ray 3D Discs in 3D. While that update may arrive in all haste, the update will happen on the manufacturer’s timetable, not yours. If you want 3D now, your safest bet is to be sure the player you buy is 3D capable the day it comes home with you. Sub-$200 players are already out there, so it’s an affordable proposition.

When you’re shopping for a Blu-ray 3D player, you must again consider the A/V receiver or surround processor you’ll be connecting the player to. While you can connect the player directly to the 3DTV, you’ll get the best audio performance if separate components provide lossless audio capability. If you’re a big spender and are buying a new AVR or surround processor with your 3DTV and Blu-ray 3D player, just make sure to get an HDMI 1.4–equipped model that the manufacturer specifically calls out as 3D capable. However, if you just bought an AVR or surround processor of the HDMI 1.3 or earlier variety, don’t panic. OPPO, Panasonic and Samsung make Blu-ray 3D players with dual HDMI outputs, and other manufacturers will undoubtedly follow suit. This allows a direct video HDMI connection to the 3DTV and a lossless-audio-capable HDMI audio connection to your AVR or surround processor.

Note too that Blu-ray 3D players are backward-compatible with 2D Blu-ray Discs, DVDs, and CDs. If you think you’re a candidate for a 3DTV down the road, you can cover your bases by investing in a 3D player now and playing all the 2D Blu-ray Discs and DVDs you can handle until you get to the third dimension.

Good Hunting
Home Theater magazine has been front and center with the Blu revolution. We get our hands on every significant player out there, and these are the hot tips we’ve distilled over time. This is the best head start we can give you in finding the right Blu-ray player for you and your system.

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Online petetherock

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A nice primer to room treatment:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/lbLVjHfHahg" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/lbLVjHfHahg</a>
« Last Edit: February 13, 2012, 06:04 by petetherock »
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Online petetherock

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« Last Edit: June 27, 2015, 20:41 by petetherock »
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