Author Topic: Before you post, this thread might help answer some of your questions in HT  (Read 103055 times)

Offline petetherock

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Offline petetherock

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Added a new thread in audio on how to solicit opinions and buy a new stereo, but it also applies to HT:

http://www.xtremeplace.com/yabbse/index.php?topic=52013.0


Beginner's buyer thread:

http://www.xtremeplace.com/yabbse/index.php?topic=52064.0

Adelphi and Sim Lim Square (SLS)

http://www.xtremeplace.com/yabbse/index.php?topic=40780.msg289694#msg289694
« Last Edit: February 29, 2008, 12:45 by petetherock »
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Understanding the Differences between HDMI Versions
« Reply #33 on: March 11, 2008, 08:21 »
http://www.audioholics.com/education/display-formats-technology/understanding-difference-hdmi-versions

Quote
HDMI 1.0

Release date: December 2002


Specs:

Single-cable digital audio/video connection with a maximum bitrate of 4.9Gbps.

Supports up to 165Mpixels/sec video (1080p at 60Hz or UXGA)
8-channels of 192kHz/24-bit audio (PCM)

Abstract: The original HDMI v1.0 spec was and remains sufficient for most purposes. The reason is that it is a solid backwards-compatible format that can , through PCM audio handle all of the high definition audio formats present today. The key is having a player that can decode these native HD audio formats to uncompressed PCM. DSD and DVD-audio cannot be natively sent over HDMI 1.0. What HDMI 1.0 fails to do, is account for additional bandwidth provided by Deep Color (10- 12 and 16-bit color depths). It also does not support the new xvYCC color space.

Practical Issues and tips: Most CableTV set-top boxes use HDMI 1.0. The maximum output for this spec is 1080p at 60Hz with 8-bit color depth. Regardless of any display of higher version of HDMI you may have, the source will always limit the maximum bit-depth potential. An HDMI 1.0 device can still pull 8 channels of uncompressed PCM audio and as is perfectly fine for most users.


HDMI 1.1

Release date: May 2004


Specs:

Added support for DVD Audio
Slight mechanical and electrical spec changes

Abstract: HDMI 1.1 simply added the ability for the system to transmit DVD-Audio signal over the cbale form the player to the receiving device. If both devices are rated to v1.1 then a DVD-Audio signal can be sent and received. Please note that by "DVD-Audio" we mean the high resolution audio format, not the audio present on a typical DVD disc.

Practical Issues and tips: HDMI 1.1 is very common and was the first spec to hit the mass market apart from CableTV set-top boxes. Many AV receivers came out with this spec and are fine for handling DVD-Audio and uncompressed PCM audio.


HDMI 1.2
Release date: August 2005

Specs:


Added DSD (Direct Stream Digital) support, allowing native transmission of Super Audio CD (SACD) content at up to 8 channels
Enabled and acknowledged an HDMI Type A connector for PC-based sources
Permitted PC sources to use native RGB color-space with the optional ability to also support the YCbCr color space for consumer electronics applications

Mandated that HDMI 1.2 and later displays support low-voltage sources such as those found with PCI Express technology (the current display interface standard for PC video cards)

Abstract: HDMI 1.2 was the biggest jump since the introduction of HDMI. It really brought the PC market into focus and was developed and announced so as to compete better with the emerging VESA DisplayPort standard. For those still clinging to their universal DVD players, HDMI v1.2 finally delivered the promise of a true one-cable solution for all current high-definition audio sources.

Practical Issues and tips: If you want to utilize a fully native universal DVD player without converting the SACD to PCM then HDMI 1.2 is required. We've found that if the player does a good job at conversion, however, v1.2 isn't always that important.

HDMI 1.2a
Release date: December 2005


Specs:

Fully specified Consumer Electronic Control (CEC) features, command sets, and compliance tests
Minor changes to CEC (Consumer Electronic Control) spec

Abstract: This incremental change clarified one of the earlier promises of HDMI, Consumer Electronic Control - a feature that promised "smart" interoperability between components. Unfortunately, this wasn't exactly standardized across the board and, as a result, nearly all manufacturers products only interface within their own brands. Of all things, this is the most disappointing failure of HDMI to-date.

Practical Issues and tips: This is a common format for manufacturers using CEC. There is no practical reason to prefer 1.2a over 1.2. If you don't intend to use the native DSD signal from an SACD player via HDMI, v1.1 is just as good as 1.2 or 1.2a.


HDMI 1.3

Release date: June 2006

Specs:


Increased single-link bandwidth to 340 MHz (10.2 Gbps)
Optionally supports 10-bit, 12-bit, and 16-bit "Deep Color" per channel (over one billion colors) up from 8-bit

Allowed the use of xvYCC color space (previously just sRGB or YCbCr)
Incorporated automatic audio "lip" syncing capability
Supported output of native Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio streams for external decoding by AV receivers

Made available a new Type C "mini" connector for devices such as camcorders
Added gamut Metadata transmission capability
Added Reference Cable Equalizer mandate to high frequency displays to recapture degraded copper cable signal

Abstract: To be plain, this update was a complete disaster. First of all, nobody asked for HDMI 1.3, except perhaps the companies behind the new high definition audio formats. Of course TrueHD and DTS-HD, the lossless audio codec formats used on HD DVDs and Blu-ray Discs could be decoded into uncompressed audio by the players. This makes 1.3 irrelevant for audio. What made HDMI 1.3 such as disaster was the increased bandwidth requirements - which hit an already suffering cable market with new requirements for digital signal transmission. Before HDMI 1.3, it was almost impossible to get a non-active copper HDMI cable to pass 1080p at distances greater than 50 feet. After HDMI 1.3, with the addition of Deep Color, that distance shrank to less than 20 feet, causing industry-wide failures on installed cabling systems.


Expensive active solutions started coming on-board to alleviate some of the problems within several months but even today there is a large amount of consumer confusion regarding cable certification and how far a signal will travel over copper cables. The spec also mandated that HDMI 1.3-compliant displays (sinks) which took advantage of high frequency content (Deep Color) must implement built-in cable equalization to help compensate for cable losses through copper cables. Thanks to several companies dedicated to certifying their products for specific distances, this issue is slowly becoming more manageable. The first product on the market with HDMI 1.3 was the PlayStation 3 gaming console.

Practical Issues and tips: HDMI 1.3 is a requirement for Deep Color support or use of the new xvYCC expanded color space. If high definition audio is important to you, you still may not need v1.3 if your player can decode the native HD audio formats into uncompressed PCM audio. This uncompressed audio, up to 8 channels, can be sent over HDMI 1.0.Typically, 24p support coincides with v1.3, however this is nothing more than coincidence of when both format and spec came into popularity.



HDMI 1.3a
Release date: November 2006


Specs:

Cable and Sink modifications for Type C
Source termination recommendation
Removed undershoot and maximum rise/fall time limits.
CEC capacitance limits changed
RGB video quantization range clarification
audio control commands added to CEC and commands for timer control brought back in an altered form

Concurrently released compliance test specification included
Abstract: An incremental change, v1.3a is mostly an adjustment for manufacturers utilizing CEC features as well as those integrating the new Type C connector (seen only in smaller form factor products and quite rare to-date).

Practical Issues and tips: There is no consumer-focused practical difference between HDMI v1.3a and v1.3.


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Offline petetherock

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Surround fields
« Reply #34 on: March 11, 2008, 23:25 »
Some images to help you get speaker placement right:

http://www.soundoctor.com/surround.htm












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Offline petetherock

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BFD usage
« Reply #35 on: March 26, 2008, 07:07 »
http://www.hometheatershack.com/forums/bfdguide/

Using the Behringer Feedback Destroyer DSP-1124P, (or the older model DSP-1100P), or the FBQ-2496 as a Parametric Equalizer in your Home Theater System to tame your subwoofer response
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Offline petetherock

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FAQS on the PS 3
« Reply #36 on: May 09, 2008, 07:18 »
http://www.xtremeplace.com/yabbse/index.php?topic=53899.0

Quote
the menu selection that you see DD/DTS/AAC/2.0 LPCM/7.1LPCM ... it's called audio output. with emphasis on the word 'OUTPUT', as in, it is what the PS3 is transmitting to your AVR.

For the HD audio formats, like DTS MA HD and DD True-HD, it is DECODED by the PS3. The decoding converts either of the HD lossless formats into LPCM, and again, this is done BY the PS3, WITHIN the PS3.

After the decoding, the PS3 is ready to send out the decoded LPCM, in any of the formats (from 2.0 LPCM to 7.1LPCM) that you specify and/or that the decoded signal is capable of. At this stage, there is no longer any more DTS MA HD or DD True-HD, as it has already been decoded. So when your AVR receives the signal, it receives it as a multi PCM or LPCM, and the appropriate number of speakers will light up.

You can options like DTS/DD/AAC because the PS3 can bitstream it (without decoding), for your AVR to decode. In this case, your AVR will recognise that it is a DTS/DD/AAC signal as it is not DECODED yet, so the decoding is done by your AVR (assuming that it's capable) instead of by the PS3.

Quote
optical was not designed for HBR audio. So if you do this, yr optical is stuck to stereo PCM or SD bitstream audio. optical does not have capability to handle Dolby TrueHD bitstream, DTS MA bitstream and much less, uncompressed multichannel PCM

Quote
Set PS3 HDMI output to Linear PCM

PS3 decodes DTS MA, TrueHD etc and outputs as Linear PCM

Yr receiver only sees it as Linear/Multichannel PCM and displays as such.

Another good PS 3 link:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?p=14491190#post14491190

Quote
Why doesn't the Dolby TrueHD or DTS HD-Master Audio light on my AVR come on when I'm playing BDs with these lossless audio formats?

Because the PS3 is doing the decoding itself of these advanced audio formats, the AVR is always receiving multichannel Linear Pulse Code Modulation (LPCM) from the PS3 when playing such BDs (when connected via HDMI). The AVR may have an indicator showing that the input is PCM, LPCM, MLPCM, or something similar. The AVR would only activate the Dolby TrueHD or DTS HD-MA light if it were doing the decoding. It would only be doing this if the source device were outputting these advanced audio formats as a bitstream and the PS3 is not capable of doing this. The end result in sound quality is in most cases essentially the same (depending on the specific capabilities of the AVR) whether the decoding is being done by the PS3 vs. having the AVR do the decoding.



A penny for the numer of times this has been asked....
« Last Edit: December 01, 2008, 07:48 by petetherock »
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Offline petetherock

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Places to buy from
« Reply #37 on: May 12, 2008, 03:09 »
(bear in mind, it is only fair that if you ask a lot of questions, and that shop gives good service that you return to them)
I really detest folks who try to circumvent the shops by going to distributors after spending a lot of time with the dealer.

If you are adventurous, there are overseas locations like HK (Xindak esp), Taiwan (esp for Usher) but then don't bug the local guy.

Some shops where people had good experiences:

Adelphi-

Electrades

KEC

http://www.xtremeplace.com/yabbse/index.php?topic=53427.0

Anson Audio

Sim Lim Square

City Electronics (esp Yamaha and Marantz)

Merdeka (Pioneer and flatscreens)

Hung Bros (for headphone and PA related stuff)

LHS (Sim Lim Tower) for wiring

Hean Lee Radio (Jln Besar Plaza) for wiring, plugs etc

There are many other shops with bargains, but some have the personality of a porcupine, so beware if you just go cheap cheap....


Places for TVs:

Apart from the big chains, which do not always give much discounts, you can try the smaller shops with low overheads, but forget demos there.

Hong Liang (Alex village)

Maximum Credit

Evergreen (AMK)

« Last Edit: May 12, 2008, 03:12 by petetherock »
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Offline petetherock

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« Last Edit: May 15, 2008, 21:16 by petetherock »
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Offline petetherock

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The DTS Bomb Issue
« Reply #39 on: May 19, 2008, 09:51 »
More info here:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1008620

Quote
Users are reporting a loud "POP" that is described as a loud firework or gunshot when using one of the above listed receivers AND bitstreaming DTS MA. This can damage your equipment!!!
The theory is certain receivers have a faulty DTS decoder chip and when coupled with certain DTS MA tracks, will cause this issue.

Ronny Katz, the Sr. Manager of Professional Audio at DTS, has already responded to this thread (see post #599) and has stated the issue is not in the DTS track or stream, and to seek assistance from your specific AVR manufacturer. Mr. Katz will not comment any further on the issue.

It is unknown at this time if all or just some models are affected.
Certain members have been in contact with Yamaha and Onkyo, though nothing official yet, it does look promising.
It is unknown at this time if the receivers can be fixed via a firmware or may need a more involved matter like shipping your unit in for a hardware change.

"kinglerxt" has received a reply from Onkyo including a firmware fix for his particular model (see post #1788). Contact your Manufacturer or visit your official owners thread for more details.




In the mean time, I highly recommend anyone using any of these receivers to NOT listen to any bitstreamed DTS MA material.

Here's a list of reported titles causing this issue:
**note** There are certainly other titles that have not been discovered yet.
-1408 (BD import)
-Golden Compass (review copy)
-The Fly (BD) time-13:00
-Chronos (BD) time-38:52
-Fantastic Four (BD) time-4:22
-Hannibal Rising (HD DVD)
-Close Encounters of the Third Kind (BD)
-Eagles Fairwell Concert (HD DVD) time-23:40
-Master and Commander (BD import) time-17:24
-Flight of the Phoenix (BD) time-51:00
-Flyboys (BD)

Be aware that just because you played any of these titles, does not mean that you don't have a problem as it appears not all titles affect every receiver.
"The Fly" seems to be the definitive test that no one with stated equipment can pass.
**see link below for a video clip of the "POP"**
Test at your own risk!!!


Note

Current gen Onkyos, x800 series Yamahas are confirmed to have it.
x63 series Yamahas, Denons and Marantz amps have sporadic reports of this too.
So far Sony seems unaffected

If you use a PS 3 to feed a LCPM signal, it will not affect you. Only Bitstream outputs.
An example of the pop:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GM3Qlh_60N4&feature=related[/youtube]
« Last Edit: June 04, 2008, 14:14 by petetherock »
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Offline petetherock

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HDMI switching and repeating
« Reply #40 on: June 03, 2008, 14:07 »
As more people hop onto the HDMI bandwagon, you need to know the difference.

Some older / more budget devices only recieve HDMI video, with no audio, others can do pass through and some do switching (between difference source), or repeating
Others can upscale the source.

Confused?

This video might help:

http://reviews.cnet.com/4660-6449_7-6759944.html

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Offline snip3r

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« Last Edit: June 04, 2008, 14:02 by snip3r »

Offline petetherock

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What is a future proof amp?
« Reply #42 on: July 23, 2008, 22:49 »
In order to avoid confusion on what makes a future proof amp, this will help...
Plus, I do not think an amp without pre-outs can be labelled as future proof...

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?p=8690911#post8690911

Quote
5.1/7.1 PCM, HDMI, and DSP - An Explanation of the Future-Proof Receiver


First things first, HDMI 1.3 is unnecessary for a receiver, a future-proof receiver with HDMI 1.1 is all you need.

Words of caution:

1) Only some receivers with HDMI currently on the market output audio over HDMI, others simply ignore the audio signal and act as a switcher (i.e. Pioneer 1016tx).

2) Movie soundtracks are recorded with the .1 (LFE) channel 10db quieter than the rest of the channels. It is a receiver's job to increase the .1 channel by 10 db, when fed a Dolby or DTS signal. Some receivers do NOT apply this 10 db increase to PCM signals over HDMI, reproducing the bass much quieter than the rest of the soundtrack. See here for more information (including which receivers do what).

3) Some PS3 games (Ridge Racer 7) will only output 7.1 and 2.0 PCM, and thus, will only output 2.0 PCM when settings indicate a 5.1 channel setup. For such games, setting the output to DD will allow 5.1 channel setups to experience properly downmixed 5.1 channels of audio.

Defintions:

These aren't rigorous, so cut me some slack.

Simple Processing
- Level trimming (volume balancing)
- Distance adjustment
- Bass management

Surround Processing
- Dolby Pro-Logic IIx provides surround upmixing from 5.1 pre-HDMI Dolby formats and two channel formats to 6.1 and 7.1 channels.
- DTS EX provides surround upmixing from specially encoded 5.1 pre-HDMI DTS formats into 6.1 channels (7.1 too?).
- Some receivers also have THX Select2 provides advanced THX processing that attempts to improve sound quality for small rooms from sound formats that were originally mixed for theaters. Also provides surround upmixing from 5.1 channels to 7.1 channels.

EQ Processing
- Some receivers provide advanced equalization, or adjustment of the volume of specific frequency bands, to help correct room acoustical problems (some even in the time-domain, i.e. Audessy).

Analog
- Provides one analog channel of lossless uncompressed PCM audio.
- Most receivers have 5.1 analog inputs, some have 7.1.

SPDIF (Coaxial, Optical)
- Provides two channel lossless uncompressed PCM audio.
- Provides all pre-HDMI Dolby and DTS formats (5.1/6.1).

HDMI 1.1
- Provides up to 8 (7.1) channels of lossless uncompressed PCM audio.
- Provides all pre-HDMI Dolby and DTS formats (5.1/6.1).
- Provides DVD-Audio streaming as PCM.

HDMI 1.2
- Adds SACD streaming as proprietary DSD format.

HDMI 1.3
- Adds up to 8 (7.1) channels of post-HDMI Dolby and DTS formats (TrueHD, etc.).

Current HD-DVD and Blue-Ray Players
- Provides pre-HDMI and post-HDMI formats through analog outputs in lossless uncompressed PCM format.
- Provides pre-HDMI and post-HDMI formats through HDMI output in lossless uncompressed PCM format.
- Provides pre-HDMI formats through HDMI output in bitstream compressed format (Dolby/DTS).
- Limited to 5.1 channels (7.1 channels will come with later players).

PS3
- Provides 7.1 channels.
- 7.1 titles include: Resistance of Man (7.1 discrete video game), Descent (6.1 matrixed to 7.1), and Crank (6.1 matrixed to 7.1).


Levels of Receivers:

Level 1
5.1 receivers that provide SPDIF, 5.1 analog input channels and provide all three processing stages on digital sources.

Examples: Virtually all 5.1 receivers.

Level 2
7.1 receivers that provide SPDIF, 5.1 analog inputs, and provide all three processing stages on digital sources.

Level 3
7.1 receivers that provide SPDIF, 5.1 analog inputs, and 5.1 HDMI PCM but can't perform surround processing on PCM digital sources.

Examples: Panasonic XR57 (no processing at all).

Level 3.5 (added late in the game)
7.1 receivers that provide SPDIF, 7.1 analog inputs, and 5.1 HDMI PCM but can't perform surround processing on PCM digital sources.

Examples: Onkyo x04 series.

Level 4
7.1 receivers that provide SPDIF, 5.1/7.1 analog inputs, and 7.1 HDMI PCM but can't perform surround processing on PCM digital sources.

Examples: Panasonic XR700 (no processing at all). Onkyo 605. Sony STR-DG810 and higher.

Level 5
7.1 recievers that provide SPDIF, 5.1/7.1 analog inputs, 5.1 HDMI PCM, and allow all three processing types on all digital signals.

Examples: HK 645 and higher. Marantz SR6001 and higher (only with latest firmware?).

Level 6
7.1 receivers that provide SPDIF, 5.1/7.1 analog inputs, 7.1 HDMI PCM, and allow all three processing types on all digital signals.

Examples: All HDMI Denons. Yamaha RX-V661/HTR-6060 and higher. Pioneer Elite 81TXV and higher. Onkyo 705 and higher. Integra *.8 series.


Future-proof decisions:

If you don't care about 7.1 surround sound, then all receivers are future proof.

If you don't care about 7.1 surround sound for post-HDMI Dolby and DTS formats, or using generally inferior DACs in your player for post-HDMI Dolby and DTS formats, then receivers Level 2 and higher are future proof.

If you don't care about 7.1 audio for post-HDMI Dolby and DTS formats, then receivers Level 3 and higher are future proof.

If you don't care about 7.1 audio for 5.1 post-HDMI Dolby and DTS formats, then receivers Level 4 and higher are future proof.

If you don't care about being at the mercy of the generally inferior DACs in your player (vs the DACs in your receiver) for 7.1 audio and switching between HDMI and Analog output for 5.1 and 7.1 sources, then receivers Level 5 and higher are future proof.

If you want a true future proof receiver with full processing on post-HDMI Dolby and DTS formats, and true digital 7.1 channel support, then Level 6 receivers are future proof (see annotation).


Annotation:

The only current 7.1 PCM HDMI source is the PS3. Receiver manuals are notoriously vague on HDMI audio support. Therefore, there are very few confirmed Level 6 receivers. Some Level 5 receivers may be Level 6 receivers. Contacting the manufacturer is the best way to confirm Level 6 receivers until people begin testing with the PS3.
« Last Edit: July 23, 2008, 22:50 by petetherock »
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Offline SiriuslyCold

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Watch this instructional video from Disney

[youtube]y6bPLAYLuwE[/youtube]

How to hook up your Home Theatre
« Last Edit: August 15, 2008, 15:24 by SiriuslyCold »

Offline petetherock

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10 tips for better home theater sound:

http://asia.cnet.com/digitalliving/tips/0,3800004921,39216559,00.htm

1. Navigate the speaker-setup menus:
Every 5.1/6.1/7.1 A/V receiver has a setup menu, but if you've never explored the options, your sound is probably out of whack. The first step is easy enough: select Speaker Size--large, small, or none--for the left- and right-front speakers, the centre speaker, and the surround speakers. As a rule of thumb, speakers with 6-inch or bigger woofers are considered large.

Next, grab a tape measure and input the full set of speaker-to-listener distances. The receiver will then make sure that the sound from all your speakers reaches your ears at exactly the same time. Some receivers require you to input that information as milliseconds rather than feet/meters--just remember that 3 milliseconds are roughly the equivalent of one meter (or 1ms equals 1 foot for the non-metric).

Finally, you'll need to make sure that all of the speakers are equal in level. Your receiver can send a test tone to each speaker, which will help you adjust the relative volume of each channel. As the sound jumps from speaker to speaker, the loudness should stay the same. You can adjust the level of each speaker by ear or you can…


2. Buy a sound-level meter:
There are some excellent, but fairly inexpensive, sound level meters on that market that will ensure more accurate level matching.


3. Ensure that speaker cables are connected correctly:
With that tangle of cables looming behind your A/V receiver, it's all too easy to mix up which wire goes where. When you're running through the speaker-level adjustments, double-check that the test tones are coming out of the intended speakers. DVDs such as Sound & Vision: Home Theater Tune-Up offer a bevy of additional tests. The Avia Guide to Home Theatre, also from Ovation Software, is a more advanced version as it has more tests and goes into greater details than the other disc. Digital Video Essentials is another test DVD that is available for PAL TV systems that also provides advice on how to adjust your home theatre for optimal results.


4. Tweak subwoofer-level and crossover controls:
Test tones and meters aren't the final arbiters in the bass department. If your sub's bass is boomy, thick, or uneven, first try lowering its level (volume) control--most folks crank their sub louder than necessary. Next, if your satellites are very small, the crossover control should also be set to its midpoint or higher. Bigger speakers produce more bass on their own, so they sound best with the sub's crossover knob set at or near the bottom of its range. Finally, moving the sub out of the corner and closer to one of the front speakers may produce smoother, flatter bass.


5. Purchase speaker stands or brackets:
Pulling speakers out of bookcases or from the tops of cabinets and placing them on floor stands or wall brackets can radically improve their sound quality.


6. Optimise speaker placement:
Even if you don't go for stands or brackets, just remember that's it's important to place the front speakers with their tweeters at--or as close as possible--to ear level. The left/right speakers should be equidistant from the 'cash seat' or primary listening position. If a speaker is within 45cm of a room's corner, angle it away from the corner and toward the main listening position.


7. Tame uncooperative acoustics if possible:
Rooms with wood or tile floors and lots of windows or mirrors always sound overly bright and zippy; a thick rug and/or window drapes will sop up some of the harshness.


8. Upgrade speaker/interconnect cables:
Are you still you using skinny, freebie wires? Moving up to higher-end cables can make a noteworthy improvement to your sound.


9. Add a separate power amplifier:
If your room is large and/or you really like to pump up the volume, you may need more power. Take a peek in your receiver's owner's manual or back panel to see if it has a set of preamp-out jacks for the left, the right, the center, the left-surround, and the right-surround channels. If your receiver is so equipped, you can go ahead and hook up a gutsy separate 100, 150, or 200W/channel amp to your receiver. Let the good times roll!


10. Buy matched speakers:
If you're currently using a cobbled-together set of speakers, consider moving up to a matched package. Even a moderately priced ensemble will offer far more cohesive sound.
Please post instead of sending a pm, so more can learn.

My gear:
https://peteswrite.blogspot.sg/2018/03/my-setup-32018.html