Author Topic: Obtain burned CDs that sound indistunguishable from Original.  (Read 4419 times)

Offline timothychan

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I can't help but notice that burned CDs have dynamics that are different from the Original CD. I read that this is due to the pitholes not well burned, causing errors and interpolation (guessing by the chip) and thus resulting in a different sound.

I also read about jitter but don't really understand alot.

Anyone has experiences ? A good brand of CDR ? (I was using EMTEC and burning at 2x when I compared to original), Good writing speed ? Software ?

Since when did everything start coming together with an expiry date ? - Chungking Express

Offline timothychan

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Re:Obtain burned CDs that sound indistunguishable from Original.
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2002, 00:06 »
Read something interesting ... I think what this guy means is that the data copied is always the same but its the medium that affects the stability of the clock.
And thus if the data from that unstable medium is copied onto a stable medium, it can sound good again.

This leads to another question of mine - whats the difference in burning using normal software and software that write RAW data ?

The burning speed may influence jitter. Bob Katz wrote in a letter on his site www.digido.com: “...A large group of mastering engineers and critical listeners agree that CDs cut in different ways tend to sound different. The CD differs from other storage media in many ways, but the critical point is that the timing of the output clock and the speed of the spinning disc are related. The output of the CD player is a clocked interface, and the data are clocked off the CD disc in a ‘linear’ fashion, one block of data after another. A buffer is used, which theoretically cleans up the timing to make it regular again, and, for the most part, it does.

“A lot of this is theory...no one has proved it as fact. And there may be more than one mechanism causing jitter taking place.

“To obtain jitter in the low picosecond region requires extremely accurate timing. Any leakage current (interference) between the servo mechanism controlling the speed of the spinning disc and the crystal oscillator controlling the output of the buffer may destabilize the crystal oscillator enough to add jitter to the clock signal. This does not change the data, by the way. If the servo is working harder to deal with a disc that has irregularly spaced pits or pits that are not clean, perhaps leakage from the servo power affects the crystal oscillator. It doesn’t take much interference to alter a clock by a tiny amount.

“This jitter is ‘ephemeral,’ though, because you can copy this data (irrelevant to the clock) and then play it back again from a more steady medium...and make it sound ‘good’ again. This is not a permanent problem.”
I think every disc burner has a certain speed where irregularity is minimized, but I don’t know how to prove it.
– adebar, Wiesbaden, Germany
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Offline Transworld

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Offline timothychan

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Re:Obtain burned CDs that sound indistunguishable from Original.
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2002, 23:57 »
Thanks alot .. will try Kodak next time.
Although Emtec is actually a very reputable brand .. sigh
Since when did everything start coming together with an expiry date ? - Chungking Express